Recent Inventory – Literature in Translation – Sharp Views

Here is a sample of some recent inclusions to the Black Forest list. These authors and titles represent the direction I am looking to build my inventory. Literature in translation, and perhaps of a somewhat edgier or experimental sort, though I believe, you will find these authors are representatives of the high quality, important global literary tradition most already know. My hope is to widen my customers’ experience and knowledge of those artists that may be less well known. I have long had a fascination of European modern and contemporary arts, as my Artists posts may illustrate.

In this particular batch you will see the First American printing of Juan the Landless, by Juan Goytisolo, the third in his Alvaro Mendiola trilogy. These works were banned from publication in Spain under the Franco government. Goytisolo passed this summer, and an informative send-off was written by William Grimes at NY Times.

Here is also the First American printing of Life and Fate, by Vasily Grossman, a novel that he was told by the Russian authorities, could not be published for 200 or 300 years. Some compare this work to Tolstoy’s War and Peace. The book was smuggled out in microforms, and the author never saw its publication.

I have also included the First printing of Robery Bly’s translation of Knut Hamsun’s Hunger, Jaroslav Hasek’s The Good Soldier Hasek, poetry by Zbigniew Herbert, and Celine’s Death on the Installment Plan, translated by Ralph Manheim.

In contrast to this last writer’s poor reputation and sometimes hateful, bitter works, (influential and significant as some may be) I have included Wolfgang Langhoff’s Rubber Truncheon.

Rubber Truncheon
1935. Trans. by Lilo Linke. Foreword by Lion Feuchtwanger. First American edition.

Arrested by the Gestapo in 1933, he spent thirteen months in prisons and Börgermoor and Lichtenberg concentration camps. This book, published in 1935, became one of the first published eyewitness accounts of Nazi evil and brutality in the concentration camps.

I hope you find yourself curious and pulled to exploring some of these works, and others that can be found under most recently listed. Some of these writers may be intimidating, for their style or unflinching content, but I also find the view can be compelling, or at least informative, certainly works of art, and perhaps relevant to where things in our own country currently stand. I hope to immerse myself in such work, to get lost, find myself, and ultimately, learn something about this difficult effort of humanity.

Be well.

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s